Adams County, Wisconsin
Place Name History
White Creek, Wisconsin



Portions Donated by Joan Benner, Jackie Hufschmid, Mike McGuiness, and Tim Stowell





ADAMS 
A description of Adams County in 1872 from the Adams County Press donated by Joan Benner

(Donated by Jackie Hufschmid)

Either for John Quincy Adams, the sixth president, or John Adams, the second 
president. The town was first called South Friendship. The citizens didn't 
like that name so they appealed to the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad 
Company, and the railway company finally decided on Adams because it was 
short. RWPN


ADAMS CENTER/CENTRE
Donated by Tim Stowell: The 1886 Post Office Guide lists Adams Centre. A United 
States Official Postal Guide, Part 1, 5th Series, Vol. 2, No. 1 printed July 1939,
informs that the Adams post office delivered to 135 rural route box holders and 
307 post office boxes.

From Page 31, Places and Faces (Marquette County WI), Vol. I, Fran Sprain, 
1991: Adams Center was a crossroads 1.5 miles SE of Adams.


ARKDALE (Donated by Tim Stowell)
The 1886 Post Office Guide lists Arkdale. A United States Official Postal Guide, 
Part 1, 5th Series, Vol. 2, No. 1 printed July 1939, informs that the Arkdale post 
office delivered to 98 rural route box holders, 19 post office boxes and 14 star routes.

(Donated by Joan Benner) Arkdale in 1871 from the May 20, 1871 Adams County Press 


BARNUM (Transcribed by Joan Benner)
Village of Barnum in 1868 from the Adams County Press

From the Adams County Press, July 27, 1872: "The mammoth lumbering mills at Barnum, in this county--the largest mills in the Wisconsin pineries--have recently changed hands, and the new owners are already at work getting ready to set the mills at work." From the Adams County Press, April 19, 1873: The village of Barnum, in the town of Rome, is jumping rapidly into prominence. During the past winter seven new dwelling houses have been erected in the place, and a fine residence is in process of construction for Mr. Russell, one of the proprietors of the mill there. The mill at Barnum, one of the largest in the Northwest, has been completely overhauled during the past winter, at an expense, as we are told, of some $10,000, and is all ready for business. We also understand that the proprietors have put in a heavy stock of logs which are now being driven into the capacious booms in the river above the mill. Business promises to be brisk in Barnum very soon. BARTON (Donated by Joan Benner) The 1858 Adams County Board meeting made provision for the organization of a new town to be called Barton. Later, the town of Barton was vacated and the south attached to Richfield and the north half to Leola. 1857 tax records give the location of Barton as T19 R7. BIG FLATS (Donated by Tim Stowell) The 1886 Post Office Guide lists Big Flats. A United States Official Postal Guide, Part 1, 5th Series, Vol. 2, No. 1 printed July 1939, does not list this place name. BIG SPRING (Donated by Tim Stowell) The 1886 Post Office Guide lists Big Spring. A United States Official Postal Guide, Part 1, 5th Series, Vol. 2, No. 1 printed July 1939, does not list this place name. See New Haven Twp., donated by Mike McGuiness. BROOKS (Donated by Jackie Hufschmid) The village was platted as Brookings in 1911. The Chicago and Northwestern Railroad did not approve of the name bacause there was already a Brookings on their line in the Dakotas. After much deliberation, it was finally decided to call the village Brooks. There is a very nice brook or trout stream just to the east of town. RWPN (Donated by Tim Stowell) The 1886 Post Office Guide does not list Brooks. A United States Official Postal Guide, Part 1, 5th Series, Vol. 2, No. 1 printed July 1939, informs that the Brooks post office delivered to 36 rural route box holders. (Donated by Joan Benner) The Brooks post office was established in 1915. Source: WSGS Newsletter, Vol. 20 No. 3, January 1974, Page 123. The post office at Brooks was officially opened Feb. 24, 1915, with Mrs. J. Bresnahan as postmistress, located in a new building just south fo the hotel near the depot. Miss Vida Wall, who had experience in working at the Oxford post office, has assisted Mrs. Bresnahan in getting things running. --Oxford Times, Feb. 25, 1915 BROWNVILLE (Donated by Joan Benner) Location from 1859 tax records: T17 R5 and 6 BUCKHORN (Donated by Joan Benner) The Buckhorn post office was established in 1869, and discontinued in 1880. Source: WSGS Newsletter, Vol. 20 No. 3, January 1974, Page 123 CASCADE Cascade was settled in about 1853 and the name later changed to White Creek. Mentioned in Solon Pierce biography in the 1901 Adams County history as the former name of the settlement at White Creek. COTTONVILLE (Donated by Joan Benner) The following is gleaned from articles about Cottonville in the August 2nd and 9th editions of the Adams County Times and Friendship Reporter. Cottonville was founded when Emulous Plutarch Cotton settled in Preston township in 1856. A plat was filed in 1857 at the Adams County Register of Deeds office by E. P.'s brother Julius for an 11-block village of Roche-A-Cree, which would become known as Cottonville. The Cotton family built a home, dam and sawmill on the Big Roche-a-Cri Creek. Julius and his son, Edgar, left the area before the onset of the Civil War. E. P. later became the postmaster of Cottonville and held various Preston township offices. He died in 1888, and is buried in the Cottonville cemetery. DAVIS CORNERS (Donated by Tim Stowell) The 1886 Post Office Guide lists Davis Corners. A United States Official Postal Guide, Part 1, 5th Series, Vol. 2, No. 1 printed July 1939, does not list this place name. (Donated by Joan Benner) Portions from an article about the history of the Davis Corners Church, Adams County Times, May 8, 2002, Page 1 According to Mrs. Amber C. Nemitz's history book about the Davis Corners church from 1880 - 1974, Davis Corners in Jackson Twp was a busy community in 1880, with a cheese factory, blacksmith shop, post office, stores and schools. The majority of the residents were Congregationalists and that was the denomination of the new church built in 1880, until 1915, when it was officially closed and remaining members went to the Oxford Presbyterian church. In 1926 the church building became a Methodist church. DELL PRAIRIE (Donated by Tim Stowell) The 1886 Post Office Guide lists Dell Prairie and it is a township in Adams County. A United States Official Postal Guide, Part 1, 5th Series, Vol. 2, No. 1 printed July 1939, does not list this place name. THE DELLS (Donated by Jackie Hufschmid) The Dells of the Wisconsin River are credited with being part of four counties: Adams, Columbia, Juneau and Sauk counties. The French word for this place is Dalles meaning "the narrows of a river" or "between the cliffs," and Dells is an adaptation. The Winnebago Indian name was Ne-hah-kecoo-na-herah meaning "the place where the rocks strike together." RWPN DELLWOOD (Donated by Jackie Hufschmid) In 1912 when the first railroad came through Adams County this was named Arkdale Station, as there was another settlement known as Arkdale about five miles north. Later the name was changed to Holmsville after the HOLM family who were pioneers of the area. In 1925 the Badger State Development Company of Chicago bought a tract of land along the river south of the settlement and divided it into lots which were sold to a number of families and called Dellwood Subdivision. About a year later Holmsville was offically changed to Dellwood. RWPN Donated by Tim Stowell: Dellwood is not listed in an 1886 Post Office Guide (United States Official Postal Guide, Part 1, 5th Series, Vol. 2, No. 1, published July 1939) informs that the Dellwood post office delivered to 20 rural route box holders. EASTON (Donated by Tim Stowell) The 1886 Post Office Guide lists Easton. A United States Official Postal Guide, Part 1, 5th Series, Vol. 2, No. 1 printed July 1939, does not list this place name. (Donated by Joan Benner) Easton twp celebrated it's 150th anniversary in 2006. Section B of the Aug. 2, 2006 Adams County Times and Friendship Reporter has photos and text about the township's history. Surnames mentioned include Billings, Brearey, Brown, Colby, Frost, Lewis, McGowan, Neff, Reichhoff, Reid, Roller, Rowena, Russell, Twist and Van Wie. Easton and early Adams County History (Donated by Jeanne Hicks)

FRIENDSHIP (Donated by Jackie Hufschmid) The original settlers came from Friendship, a small town in Allegheny County, New York. RWPN (Donated by Tim Stowell) The 1886 Post Office Guide lists Friendship, the county seat. A United States Official Postal Guide, Part 1, 5th Series, Vol. 2, No. 1 printed July 1939, informs that the Friendship post office delivered to 295 rural route box holders and 93 post office boxes. (Abstracted from the Friendship Reporter) Abstracted from the Adams County Times & Friendship Reporter, June 27, 2007 Adams county was created March 11, 1848 by the legislature of the Wisconsin Territory. By 1853, Adams county included what is now Juneau and Adams counties. Most of the people lived on the West side of the Wisconsin River so when a referendum was held in 1856 it was decided the river should be the border between the two counties. At about the same time as the division of Adams and Juneau counties, the area that is now Friendship was first bought sight unseen by Henry Whitney, as part of an 80 acre parcel at the rapids of the Roche-A-Cri. The property was quickly resold to land speculators Luther Stowell and William Burbank, who were the developers, buying the parcel to divide and resell. They built a grist mill and platted the village into lots to be re-sold, naming the new village Friendship, after their home town in New York. Most of the new settlers were American born and white, coming from New England, New York and other northeastern states. Many were English, or Holland Dutch, and they were soon joined by newly arrived Irish, German, Norwegian and still later, Danish settlers. They travelled most often via the Erie Canal, and after landing at Chicago or Milwaukee, set out on foot or on wagons to the frontier, where land cost much less than in settled areas. After organization of the new village of Friendship was well underway, Stowell and Burbank and other settlers then petitioned the County Board to move the county seat from Quincy to their new village. In return the County Seat Building Company would donate land and build a new county courthouse at Friendship. The required referendum held in April 1858 was won by a marin of 155 votes and constructon started almost immediately on a two-story building, 26 x 40 feet in size. The young county and village had a law enforcement presence, but there was so little crime committed a jail was not built until 1869. Even then, the windowless sandstone building on the courthouse lawn was not really considered a 'jail' and a real jail was not built until 1907, after the Village of Friendship incorporated. GERMANTOWN At the special session of the County Board in March, 1855, a portion of township seventeen, and the north half of township sixteen as lies west of the Wisconsin River, were detached from Quincy and ordered to constitute the town of Germantown. This township later became part of present day Juneau County. GRAND MARSH (Donated by Jackie Hufschmid) There is a large marsh north of the town. Farmers for miles around referred to it as the Grant Marsh. The village was born in 1911 when the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad built tracks through Adams County. It was almost burned down at one time, but has been partially rebuilt. RWPN (Donated by Tim Stowell) The 1886 Post Office Guide lists Grand Marsh. A United States Official Postal Guide, Part 1, 5th Series, Vol. 2, No. 1 printed July 1939, informs that the Grand Marsh post office delivered to 183 rural route box holders and 24 post office boxes. HADLOCK (donated by Joan Benner) From the obit of Franc Keyes Dittburner, Oct. 14, 1911 "Hadlock, in the northern part of Quincy" HOLMSVILLE Holmsville is now known as the Dellwood area. JACKSON TOWNSHIP Jackson Township in 1872 donated by Joan Benner

From the Adams County Press, 1870's (Donated by Mike McGuiness) Compromises town 15, range 7. Originally it contained all of the county in its present shape, and may very justly claim to be the mother or grandmother of all the towns in the county except Quincy. But while she ranks as the oldest town in the county, she has from time to time been shorn of her anciently magnificent proportions, and brought down to her present modest dimensions of six miles square. The geology of the town bears ineffaceable marks of the great drift from the north to which we have before referred and which washed and rubbed and formed the "backbone" that divides the waters that flow into the Wisconsin from those that flow into the Fox. In this drift ridge are found the indisputable evidences that at some time in the great past, there was washed from the Lake Superior region the vast material from which this ridge is formed. Copper, silver, iron, and rock, not native to there resting place, are found mixed with clay, gravel and drift sand. The minerals, however, have never been found in paying quantities; but Mr. D. L. McConic, at Davis Corners, has several interesting and valuable specimens of pure silver taken from the drift. As might be inferred from what we have said already, a great part of the town is high and rolling, but it is mostly covered with a thrifty growth of timber, which will ultimately become a great source of wealth if the fires are rigidly kept from running through the woods. Beautiful lakes dot the landscape and add to its beauty, while affording an abundance of excellent fish. Jordan Lake is a beautifully clear sheet of water, a half mile wide and nearly one and a half mile long, situated near the southern boundary of the town. South of and bordering upon this lake, lies the county Poor Farm. Parker Lake lies about two miles north of Jordan Lake. Crooked Lake which derives its name from its tortuous form, lies a little southeast of Parker Lake. Deep Lake so named because that no successful attempt to sound its bottom has yet been made, lies a short distance to the northeast of Parker Lake. The Neenah Creek has its rise on or near the northeast quarter of section 16, and flows easterly through the town. It is a rapid, beautiful stream of clear spring water, flowing over a rocky, stony bed. There is an excellent unimproved water-power on this stream which will yet some day handsomely renumerate the man who will improve it. North of the Neenah lie Wolf and Goose Lakes, two small sheets of water. The water in all these is generally pure. A singular feature about them is that, with the exception of Crooked Lake, none of them has a visible inlet or outlet. Around these lakes are many beautiful and fertile farms. On either side of the ridge are broad, expansive flats of rich arable lands, cut into farms, annually producing abundant crops. And we predict that someday the best wheat and fruit growning region of the county will be found upon the white and bur oak cobble hills of Jackson and towns lying across the same drift line. The people of the town take praiseworthy interest in educational matters, and good school houses are conveniently located, and the schools well and liberally sustained. Its beautiful scenery, interesting geological formations, pure air, healthy climate, and excellent farming and grazing lands, commend this town to those seeking homes or a resting place in the west. Two well-kept public houses entertain and feed the way-farer--one by H. W. Landon, the other by T. G. Burnham and both located near Little Lake, on the stage road from Kilbourn to Friendship. Mr. E. Stockwell, an excellent mechanic, has his blacksmith shop at Davis Corners. Mr. T. M. Mayhew of the same place manufactures every kind and style of brooms. Good farm houses, barns and out buildings scattered over the town give evidence of the prosperity and thrift of the people. --Adams County Press, Nov 24, 1869 LEOLA Source: Annotated from Harry Davis's letter to the editor printed in the Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune April 6, 2007. In 1852 Uriah Dorman established the first settlement, a tavern or overnight resting place in the northeastern part of Adams county. Most of the visitors were travelers going to and from Plainfield and Grand Rapids (now Wisconsin Rapids). They could spend the night, get a meal and shelter for their horses before continuing on their journey. Not much later, John Holiday's mill, located on the Big Roche-A-Cri Creek grew faster than Dormanville, and the economic center shifted to the southern portion of Leola township. In later years population increased surrounding Leola Ditch, when the wetlands were drained for farmland. The Leola town hall is currently located on Anwa Lane just east of the Highway G and Highway 73 intersection. LITTLE LAKE (Donated by Tim Stowell) The 1886 Post Office Guide lists Little Lake. A United States Official Postal Guide, Part 1, 5th Series, Vol. 2, No. 1 printed July 1939, does not list this place name. See Jackson Township, donated by Mike McGuiness. MONROE CENTER (Donated by Tim Stowell) The 1886 Post Office Guide lists Monroe Centre. A United States Official Postal Guide, Part 1, 5th Series, Vol. 2, No. 1 printed July 1939, does not list this place name. NEWARK VALLEY (Donated by Joan Benner) Formed from a portion of Quincy Township, by an action of the 1858 Adams County Board. Newark Valley was later vacated, and the territory divided between Adams, Quincy and Strongs Prairie. Location from 1859 tax records: T17 R5. NEW CHESTER (Donated by Mike McGuiness) From the Adams County Press, 1870's Now comprises township 16, range 7. It is bounded on the north by Lincoln, and west by Easton. On its first organization the town included, in addition to its present territory, all of the town of Easton. In 1857, the town was divided and Easton formed the western half. What has been said about the geological formation and characteristics of the town of Jackson is measurably true of New Chester. There are the same indications of the drift, the same traces of copper, silver and other mineral substances. The western part of the town is quite level, and is either gently rolling prairies or oak openings. The prairies and openings are generally quite sandy, with occasional areas of clay. The center and east lie upon the ridge dividing the water sheds of the Fox and Wisconsin rivers. This part is well timbered and the soil generally fertile and productive. There are four small lakes in the town having in general the same interesting character of those in Jackson. In one of these lakes, the McGuinnis, one branch of the Neenah Creek has its source, and flows thence into the Fox river. Deposits of loose cobble limestone are found in several places in the town, one of which was worked for a number of years during the early settlement of the town. The town has no villages proper. The congregational society have a good church, situated on section 14, which was erected in 1858. On section 1 are found several of those evidences of a prehistoric race, of which not even tradition speaks. Upon the brow of the hill overlooking the Duck Creek, are the well-defined remains of ancient earthwork fortifications. The works extend from northwest to southeast, with redoubts, angles, and other evidences that the builders possessed quite advanced ideas of the science of military engineering. On the parapet of one of the redoubts now stands an oak tree about twenty inches in diameter, showing that these works are of great age. The people of the town realize the advantages of good schools, and are liberal in the building of good school houses. There are many good farm houses, commodious barns and out buildings, and the people seem generally thriving and prosperous. (Donated by Tim Stowell) The 1886 Post Office Guide lists New Chester. A United States Official Postal Guide, Part 1, 5th Series, Vol. 2, No. 1 printed July 1939, does not list this place name. NEW HAVEN TOWNSHIP (Donated by Mike McGuiness) From the Adams County Press, 1870's Is the south east town in the county, and appears to have been organized for town purposes in the Spring of 1956 [sic]; for, though we are unable to find any record of the action of the County Board organizing the town, it was first represented on the Board at the November session of that year. Mr. A. C. Chamberlain was Chairman that year. It was organized by the name of Big Spring, but the following November the name was changed to New Haven. The town at present comprises all of township 14, range 7, except sections 6, 7, 18, 10, 30 and 31, which form a part of Dell Prairie. It is exceedingly well adapted to both agricultural and manufacturing pursuits and enterprises. The soil, except a small portion in the northern part, consists of a rich clayey alluvial deposit, well adapted to the luxuriant growth of all kinds of grains, clover, timothy and other grains. Of timber there is sufficient for all the needs of the people of the town, consisting mainly of white, burr and black oak, with soft maple and poplar along the streams and on the lower flats. The thriving village of Big Spring is located in this town. Four fine water-powers fed by never failing streams of spring water are already improved. The first in importance is that used to drive the Big Spring Flouring and Custom Mills, J. B. Rose, proprietor, whose milling products have acquired an excellent reputation wherever known. A half mile west are the "Variety Works" of Hon. G. M. Marshall, where sawing, planing, casting, and the manufacture of tools and machinery is largely carried on. This is a beautiful power, finely improved, and the proprietor and citizens of the place are rightfully proud of the improvement. Nearly a half a mile west of the Variety Works, are the Carriage and Wagon Shops of Mr. N. R. Richardson, this is a fine little water-power, furnishing abundant motive force to drive the machinery in the shops, consisting of saws, planer, lathes, &c. The remaining improved water-power is owned by Mr. J. M. Winchell, and is used to drive a saw-mill. Besides these there are several other water-powers, in the town of more of less capacity, which are ultimately destined to be utilized, and made to add to the prosperity and growth of the town. Big Spring has two stores--one, comprising a large General Stock of Dry Goods, Groceries, Boots, and Shoes, and in fact everything usually found in a well appointed country store, owned by Mr. B. S. Wilber. The other is owned by E. S. Pierce & Son, who confined their trade principally to Groceries, Boots, Shoes, Clocks, &c. Both houses bear an excellent reputation for fair dealing. Three well-kept and comfortable Hotels furnish abundant entertainment for all the public. The proprietors are B. S. Wilber, W. S. Pierce, and John Stowell. There are three blacksmith shops, of which that of Mr. Vliet should bear special mention. The trout ponds of the Richardson Bros. are located in this town, and are a source of great interest and amusement to hundreds of people. In these ponds great numbers of speckled trout--the most beautiful and valuable of food fishes--are annually raised. Of public buildings and societies, New Haven makes a very fair showing. One beautiful church, built by a union of the Congregational and Baptist Societies, five excellent school-houses, in one of which a graded school is maintained, and Wilber's Hall, a commodious structure, mark the public enterprise of the people. Big Spring Grange, No. 466, A. L. Snyder, M., and D. K. Wells, O., was organized in April 1874 and now numbers forty members. Beacon Light Lodge, No. 61, of I. O. of G. T., E. P. Richardson, W. C. T., and F. H. Marshall, W. S., is represented in a flourishing condition. The village of Big Spring is about eight miles from Kilbourn City and fourteen miles from Portage. NEW ROME (Donated by Tim Stowell) The 1886 Post Office Guide lists New Rome. A United States Official Postal Guide, Part 1, 5th Series, Vol. 2, No. 1 printed July 1939, informs this post office delivered to 81 rural box holders, 4 Post Office Boxes and 3 star routes. NIEBULL (Donated by Joan Benner) Niebull was a Big Flats area community circa 1890. There was a log school built in the area of Bighorn Avenue about 1875, later replaced by a traditional frame building circa 1896. This Niebull school was one of the last one room schools to close with the statewide consolidation of school districts in the 1950's. This one room school has been moved to the grounds of the Adams County Historical Society (McGowan House) in Friendship. OLIN (Donated by Tim Stowell) The 1886 Post Office Guide lists Olin. A United States Official Postal Guide, Part 1, 5th Series, Vol. 2, No. 1 printed July 1939, does not list this place name. See Springville, donated by Mike McGuiness. PILOT KNOB (Donated by Tim Stowell) The 1886 Post Office Guide lists Pilot Knob. A United States Official Postal Guide, Part 1, 5th Series, Vol. 2, No. 1 printed July 1939, does not list this place name. PLAINVILLE (Donated by Tim Stowell) The 1886 Post Office Guide lists Plainville. The United States Official Postal Guide, Part 1, 5th Series, Vol. 2, No. 1 printed July 1939, also lists this place name. POINT BLUFF (Donated by Tim Stowell) The 1886 Post Office Guide lists Point Bluff. A United States Official Postal Guide, Part 1, 5th Series, Vol. 2, No. 1 printed July 1939, does not list this place name. QUINCY (Donated by Tim Stowell) The 1886 Post Office Guide lists Quincy. A United States Official Postal Guide, Part 1, 5th Series, Vol. 2, No. 1 printed July 1939, does not list this place name. Quincy was the first Adams County seat, until an election was held in 1858 to move the county seat to Friendship, which was done in January, 1859. (Joan Benner) ROCHE-A-CRI (Donated by Tim Stowell) The 1886 Post Office Guide lists Roche-a-Cri. A United States Official Postal Guide, Part 1, 5th Series, Vol. 2, No. 1 printed July 1939, does not list this place name. SPRING BLUFF (Donated by Tim Stowell) The 1886 Post Office Guide lists Spring Bluff. A United States Official Postal Guide, Part 1, 5th Series, Vol. 2, No. 1 printed July 1939, does not list this place name. SPRING CREEK (Donated by Tim Stowell) The 1886 Post Office Guide lists Spring Creek. A United States Official Postal Guide, Part 1, 5th Series, Vol. 2, No. 1 printed July 1939, does not list this place name. SPRINGVILLE Springville in 1872 from the Adams County Press, August 1872, Donated by Joan Benner. Donated by Mike McGuiness, From the Adams County Press, 1870's Lies north of Dell Prairie. The Wisconsin river runs along its western line, White Creek and Easton form its northern and Jackson its eastern boundary. The town is largely comprised of the drift formation which occurred at the time when, by some terrific convulsion of nature, the mighty jaws of the Dalles were torn asunder and the great waters of northern Wisconsin, changing their course toward the Gulf of St. Lawrence, flowed southward to the Gulf of Mexico. The beautiful scenery of the Wisconsin extends along the western line of this town, but here the ruggedness of nature has been toned down. The crags, though quite as high as any farther down the river, slope more gradually, and are covered with a fine growth of oak, birch, maple, linden and other varieties of forest trees; yet here and there a ragged crag of stupendous proportion, projects from the surrounding plain. Such are Pt. Bluff, Temple's Rock, Ackerman's Bluff, Van Wie's Bluff, and the range of bluffs in the northeastern part of the town near Indian Spring, an old camping ground of the aborigines, now owned by Mr. J. Casad. The central part of the town is quite rolling and sandy, covered sparsely with timber. This whole section might become of great value if the annual fires that sweep over it could be kept out, the young timber permitted to grow, and the annual crop of leaves and other vegetation allowed to lie upon and enrich the soil. Along the river valley and in the east part of the town are many beautiful, well-tilled, fertile and productive farms. Twin Valley is a rich section located in this town. At Olin near the southeast corner of the town is situated the excellent flouring mill of F. Eichler. There are at least two other good water powers in the town as yet unimproved, but awaiting the coming man to direct their latent forces to the production of wealth. Several fine streams of pure spring water flow down the western slope to the Wisconsin river, affording splendid opportunities for the propagation of fish. The people are well provided with schools. Good school-houses are located at Olin, Pt. Bluff, and Twin Valley. Mr. S. W. Davis, an old resident of the town has a store at Point Bluff - dealing in groceries, stationery, drugs, medicines, &c. STRONG'S PRAIRIE (Donated by Tim Stowell) The 1886 Post Office Guide lists Strong's Prairie. A United States Official Postal Guide, Part 1, 5th Series, Vol. 2, No. 1 printed July 1939, informs this post office delivered to 75 rural route box holders and 53 star routes. WESTBROOK At the 1854 session of the Adams County Board, the town of Westbrook, comprising all of townships fourteen and fifteen in ranges five and six east of the Wisconsin River, was ordered to be organized, and Jackson was cut down to townships fourteen and fifteen of range seven. WHITE CREEK White Creek in 1872 donated by Joan Benner

(Donated by Tim Stowell) The 1886 Post Office Guide lists White Creek. A United States Official Postal Guide, Part 1, 5th Series, Vol. 2, No. 1 printed July 1939, informs this post office delivered to 21 post office boxes.


Sources for Place Name History

RWPN = The Romance of Wisconsin Place Names, by Robert E. Gard and L. D. Sorden Stennett = A History of the Origin of the Place Names Connected with the Chicago and North Western and Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha Railways. Compiled by W. H. Stennett Adams County Press, November 24, 1869 (Jackson Twp) Adams County Times, July 17, 1947 (Post Office History) Postal Guides, Tim Stowell: "The 1886 reference is missing its cover and first 13 pages so it's a bit of a mystery. It appears to have been published by an independent organization as it has advertisements in the back of the book. The 1939 reference is a United States Official Postal Guide, Part 1, July 1939, 5th Series, Vol 2, No. 1." In 1886 there were 1,478 postoffices in Wisconsin.





Back to menu
Loading

This site is maintained by Joan

and was last updated
Have a question? Please
Contact Us